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A Sense of Purpose May Benefit Your Brain
Having a strong sense of purpose in life may lower the likelihood of brain tissue damage in older adults, new research suggests. Autopsies conducted among adults in their 80s revealed that those who felt their lives had meaning had far fewer macroscopic infarcts -- small areas of dead tissue resulting from blockage of blood flow. This kind of brain tissue damage is believed to boost the risk for developing dementia, movement problems, disability and or dea ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Yoga Gaining in Popularity Among Americans
Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. One survey found a little less than 6 percent of adult Americans said they had tried yoga, tai chi or qi gong back in 2002, but that figure jumped to slightly more than 10 percent in 2012, fueled mostly by yoga. And a second survey that focused on children found a similar trend Yoga had been tried by about 1.7 million children in 2012, representing an increase o ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Try Drug-Free Options First for Low Back Pain, New Guidelines Say
People with low back pain should try drug-free remedies -- from simple heat wraps to physical therapy -- before resorting to medication, according to new treatment guidelines. Low back pain is among the most common reasons that Americans visit the doctor, according to the American College of Physicians ACP , which released the new guidelines on Monday. The recommendations put more emphasis on nondrug therapies than previous ones have. They stress that powe ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Massage Eases Pain, Anxiety After Surgery
A 20-minute evening back massage can help relieve the pain and anxiety that often follows major surgery, new research shows. In patients getting massage, the acute response was equivalent to a [dose] of morphine, which was pretty remarkable, said study senior author Dr. Daniel B. Hinshaw, professor of surgery and a member of the palliative care team at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System in Michigan. According to Hinshaw, the idea for the study originated y ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Massage May Improve Blood Flow While Easing Muscle Soreness: Study
Massage therapy can help ease sore muscles and improve blood flow for people who are active as well as for those who do not exercise, a small study finds. Those effects can last for more than 72 hours, researchers found. People with poor circulation or limited ability to move are among those who could benefit most from massage therapy, they noted. Our study validates the value of massage in exercise and injury, which has been previously recognized but base ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Timing Is Key to Massage's Benefits for Neck Pain: Study
Massage can relieve neck pain if it s done often by a professional therapist and for the correct length of time, according to new research. One-hour sessions two or three times a week appear to be best, said study researcher Karen Sherman, senior scientific investigator at Group Health Research Institute in Seattle. In the short term, 60 minutes of massage is better than 30, and you want to do multiple treatments a week for the first four weeks, she said. ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Common Painkillers Don't Ease Back Pain, Study Finds
Painkillers like aspirin, Aleve and Advil don t help most people with back pain, a new review finds. The researchers estimated that only one in six people gained a benefit from taking these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDs . Meanwhile, previous research has suggested that another common painkiller, Tylenol acetaminophen , isn t very useful either, the study authors added. The findings raise the prospect that no over-the-counter painkillers reall ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Easing Depression Without a Prescription
A brisk run, a friendly game of chess, a soothing massage All these pursuits can help ease mild depression, experts say. These are all things that are certainly worth trying and are generally healthy, anyway, said Dr. Nadia Marsh, an expert in treating depression and chief of the division of geriatrics at Cabrini Medical Center, in New York City. Marsh stressed, however, that alternative or complementary therapies probably won t do much to ease really seri ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Massage Right After Muscle Injury May Boost Healing
Massage is known to help heal muscle injury, but the degree of recovery may depend on certain factors, such as the timing of the treatment, according to the results of a study in rabbits. The findings could one day lead to specific prescriptions for massage to help exercise-induced muscle injury in athletes, the researchers saID. Knowing that massage therapy can ease muscle pain and weakness associated with exercise, the researchers from Ohio State Univers ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Hand and foot massages can help console bereaved people, Swedish researchers have found. The study included 18 people, aged 34 to 78, who d just lost a relative to cancer. They were offered a 25-minute hand or foot massage once a week for eight weeks and could choose whether to have their massages at home, work or in a hospital. Nine participants chose foot massage, eight chose hand massage, and one had both types of massages. Only three had previously rec ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Are Your Gifts Always Getting Returned?
Despite the best of intentions, some gifts just fall flat and end up getting returned. How can there be such a disconnect between giver and recipient A new study suggests the answer lies in perceptions. According to the study, gift givers focus on the thrill of the moment when the gift is given. But the recipient focuses on how it will be used. The biggest mistake that people make is that they end up thinking about gift giving as a gift giver, instead of f ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Many Take Opioids Reluctantly for Back Pain: Survey
Millions of Americans with back pain take powerful and potentially addictive opioid painkillers. But in a new survey, many say the drugs provide only limited relief and they worry about taking them. The survey included more than 2,000 people with low back pain. Of the nearly half who were currently taking opioids, only 13 percent said the drugs were very successful at relieving their pain. Forty-four percent said the drugs were somewhat successful, 31 perc ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
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