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Treatment for Teething Pain Poses Serious Health Threat: FDA
Consumers should stop using over-the-counter teething products that contain benzocaine because they pose a serious health threat to infants and young children, U.S. health officials warned Wednesday. Benzocaine can cause a serious health threat called methemoglobinemia, which greatly reduces the level of oxygen carried through the blood. The condition is potentially fatal, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in a news release. Benzocaine is marketed ...
Healthday - Mon. May 28
Most First-Time Moms Say Labor Pains Were Manageable
Many first-time mothers have mistaken ideas about managing the pain of childbirth, a new survey reveals. The survey, commissioned by the American Society of Anesthesiologists ASA , included more than 900 U.S. mothers, 73 percent of whom had vaginal births. While many said they had less pain than feared, many went into labor with false ideas about what to expect 74 percent thought they couldn t have an epidural after a certain time in labor, even though the ...
Healthday - Mon. May 28
No Evidence Acupuncture Boosts Fertility Treatment
Although some women may try acupuncture hoping it will help them conceive, new research suggests it won t. The study compared outcomes for more than 800 Australian and New Zealand women who underwent either real or sham acupuncture along with their in vitro fertilization IVF treatments. The women ranged in age from 18 to 42 and underwent IVF cycles using fresh embryos, according to an Australian team led by Caroline Smith, of the NICM Health Research Insti ...
Healthday - Fri. May 18
Massage Beats Meds for Lower Back Pain, Study Says
Massage therapy may be better than medication or exercise for easing low back pain in the short term, a new government-funded study suggests. Seattle researchers recruited 401 patients, mostly middle-aged, female and white, all of whom had chronic low back pain. Those who received a series of either relaxation massage or structural massage were better able to work and be active for up to a year than those getting usual medical care, which included painkill ...
Healthday - Mon. May 14
Device Might Detect Breast Cancer-Linked Swelling Sooner
Testing for small changes in the flow of lymph fluids after breast cancer surgery can spot the start of a painful swelling known as lymphedema before it becomes hard to treat, a new study suggests. Evaluating nearly 150 breast cancer patients considered at high risk for lymphedema, researchers found that measuring lymph flow using bioimpedance spectroscopy helped prompt earlier intervention. The device uses electrical current to assess body fluid volume. O ...
Healthday - Mon. May 7
Massage Therapist Sues Marvel Comics' Stan Lee For Alleged Sexual Misconduct
Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee is being sued by Chicago-based massage therapist Maria Carballo for allegedly sexually harassing and grabbing her during two massage appointments last year. Carballo s complaint, filed Monday in Cook County circuit court, names Lee and his assistant Mac Max Anderson, who arranged the massage appointments. The complaint lists charges including assault, battery and emotional stress , and Carballo is seeking over 50,000 in damages, ...
Huffington Post - Sat. Apr 28
Your Robot Masseuse Will See You Now
The backaches of the future may have a new remedy -- developers say a robot masseuse is now treating patients in Singapore. Known as Emma for Expert Manipulative Massage Automation , the robot mimics the human palm and thumb and specializes in back and knee massages, according to its developers. It is used alongside a doctor and massage therapist and, the developers said, provides a massage that is described by patients as almost indistinguishable from a p ...
Healthday - Mon. Apr 23
Diet, Exercise Can Ease Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Treatment
Exercise and healthy eating can counter the harmful side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancer, a new study suggests. Androgen-deprivation therapy suppresses testosterone and other male hormones that drive prostate cancer growth. But suppressing those hormones leads to loss of muscle mass and strength as well as increased body fat, which puts patients at risk for diabetes, heart disease and other health problems, the Ohio State University research ...
Healthday - Fri. Apr 13
Heart Attack Survival Better When Specialists Are Out of Town
Believe it or not, new research suggests that people hospitalized for a heart attack are more likely to survive when certain heart specialists are out of town. The study of more than 34,000 U.S. heart attack patients found survival rates were higher when interventional cardiologists were attending their annual conference. Those cardiologists are specialists in using minimally invasive procedures such as angioplasty and stenting to treat a heart attack. Dur ...
Healthday - Fri. Mar 16
For City Kids With Asthma, Nearby Green Space Is Key
Living near a park can help reduce asthma symptoms among children who live in cities, researchers say. The new study included 196 inner-city children in Baltimore, aged 3 to 12 years, with persistent asthma. Some lived close to a park or other green space, while others were more than 0.6 miles away from one. The farther the children lived from a park, the more asthma symptoms they had over a two-week period, the study found. For every 1,000 feet between th ...
Healthday - Thu. Mar 8
Opioids Not Best Option for Back Pain, Arthritis, Study Finds
Risky opioids are no better at controlling chronic back or arthritis pain than non-opioid drugs, including Tylenol or Motrin, new research finds. With opioid overdose deaths rising in the United States, the findings suggest addictive medications like oxycodone OxyContin or morphine don t have to be the first choice against crippling arthritis pain or chronic backache. We found that opioids had no advantages over non-opioid medications for pain, function or ...
Healthday - Thu. Mar 8
Lasers, Freezes: Non-Surgical Fat Reducers Gaining Popularity
Fat can be easy to put on, but much tougher to remove. Now, the latest data shows Americans are increasingly turning to non-surgical means of fat reduction. The annual report from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons ASPS finds big jumps in the popularity of noninvasive body shaping techniques -- everything from ultrasound to radio waves, infrared light, injected medications and vacuum-massage treatments. Use of freeze technologies -- techniques that p ...
Healthday - Thu. Mar 1
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