fb_thumb
Relax 'N Go Massage | Article

On Campus Massage: a Popular Service Offered Year Round on Nationwide Colleges

8/2/2012
You may be familiar with colleges that have hired massage therapists to give students free chair massages during finals, etc. Unfortunately, limiting committee budgets only allow for this de-stressing "treat" once or twice a year.

Some universities have found a way to offer this service year round, at virtually no cost to them. They offer massage through the Heath Center or Fitness Center at a reduced price to students and faculty.

Think your school might benefit from including this in-demand service? The following is a list of key issues you need to consider.

~Massage Therapist(s): Make sure your massage therapist is certified and carries individual liability insurance. More and more states are requiring massage therapists to be licensed. Here’s a map of licensed states: http://www.massagetherapy.com/careers/stateboards.php

~Space: You will need a dedicated room for the massage (a minimum of 8’x12’). Some schools used space in the Recreation Center, others, the Health Center.

~Menu of Services: Most schools offer a 30 minute and 60 minute table massage. Most common techniques include Swedish, Deep Tisssue, and Sports massage. Some schools even offered a block of time dedicated to 10 minute chair massages.

~Availability: Begin offering massage services 1-2 days/week; 2-4 hours/per day and add more as needed.
Scheduling appointments: Begin by having the students/faculty contact massage therapist to schedule appointments (unless you have a staff who can take calls).

~Price: 30 minute massages for students ranged from $25-$40; 60 minute student massages ranged from $45-$65. All schools had a slightly higher price (about $10) for faculty and the public members of the fitness center.

~Payment: All schools handled the payment transaction. Most required to be pre-paid 24 hours before the massage, with no refund for lateness or no show.

~Equipment: Massage therapist should provide massage table, linens, oils, and music.

~Policies and procedures: It’s a good idea to collaborate with your massage therapist and create a brief policies and procedures document in addition to a health intake form.

~Employee vs Independent Contractor: Most schools contracted the massage therapists as independent contractor, while one school considered them employees (stating it was an easier, more efficient way to pay them as a part time employee due to inter-campus payroll system)

~Commission/Split: This depends whether your school wants to make a profit on this service. Most schools were mainly interested in covering costs, so they would keep about 5% and give the rest to the massage therapist.

The main thing is to start out small, see what the demand is, and adjust accordingly.